Hunger Hormone Affects Alcohol Intake

X-ray of human body

A new study by researchers at the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) provides further evidence that a hormone produced in the stomach influences alcohol consumption in humans. As reported in Molecular Psychiatry, researchers led by Lorenzo Leggio, M.D., Ph.D., demonstrated that the hormone, called ghrelin, may be a promising target for developing … Read more

Behavioral Interventions That Address Alcohol Use Help People Living With HIV/AIDS

Doctor speaking to a patient

There are more than 36 million people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) worldwide. Alcohol misuse is a significant concern for this population because it contributes to risky sexual behavior, reduces adherence to HIV medication regimens, and exacerbates other health conditions. Interventions that address alcohol misuse among PLWHA have the potential to help improve their health outcomes. … Read more

Brain Studies Point to Perils of Adolescent Alcohol Use

Image of a brain

The brain takes longer to develop and mature than any other organ in the body. Beginning in the third week of gestation and extending into the mid-20s, an ongoing interplay of genetic and environmental factors results in the mature human brain, a structure composed of more than 100 billion neurons. Some of the most rapid … Read more

NIAAA Scientists Provide More Evidence that Binge Drinking May Indicate Vulnerability to Alcohol Use Disorder

An NIAAA study shows that people who drink socially and have certain risk factors for alcohol use disorder (AUD) self-administer more alcohol and at a faster rate during a single laboratory session of alcohol consumption than people at low risk for developing AUD. Participants with all three risk factors evaluated in this study—being male, having … Read more

Anti-Smoking Medication May Reduce Alcohol Craving

Varenicline, an anti-smoking medication, may reduce craving for alcohol in people who drink heavily and for people with alcohol use disorder (AUD) who are also depressed, according to two recent studies. The research, funded by NIAAA and led by Sherry McKee, Ph.D., Professor of Psychiatry at Yale School of Medicine, provides more evidence that varenicline … Read more